Grafted Heirloom Tomatoes available at Raulston Blooms!

My all time FAVORITE Heirloom Tomatoes will be available for sale during Raulston Blooms Saturday April 2, 2016 at the JC Raulston Arboretum.  top ten.png

These varieties have been grown and GRAFTED with care by the experts at Banner Greenhouses to ensure success for gardeners in the hot, humid southeastern climate!  Join me on Saturday April 2 at 10:30am for my presentation on Foodscaping, which includes all the tips to successfully grow the Ultimate Taste of Summer! 

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‘Cream Sausage’ is a great Tomato for every gardener.  It can be grown in a patio container, in the ground or in a hydroponics system.  It is a heavy fruiting, paste variety with a delicious flavor and unique color.  Cream Sausage make a gorgeous sauce and salsa, and can be juiced for making a dynamic Bloody Mary base!

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‘Giraffe’ is my favorite Tomato for the late season… dream of serving garden fresh sliced tomatoes during the winter holidays?  THIS is the tomato for you!  Hundreds of fruits will slowly ripen after harvest allowing you to enjoy the taste of summer all winter long!

Preserving the Taste of Summer: Tomato Juice

Learn how to preserve the ultimate taste of summer

Book Brie for your next meeting or plan to attend these great events in 2016:

Raulston Blooms! A Garden Festival for All Ages

Saturday, April 2, 2016 – 9am–4pm

JC Raulston Arboretum
4415 Beryl Road Raleigh, NC 27606

Cost: Free for Members/ $5 for non members

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Moore Farms Botanical Garden
100 New Zion Road Lake City, SC 29560

Thursday, July 23, 2016  9:30 am – 2:00 pm   Cost: $25 per person

REGISTER HERE: http://moorefarmsbg.org/events/foodscaping-101/

 

Brie’s Tomato Juice

Prep Time: 5 minutesbrie w tomato juice
Process Time: 1 minute
Serve it fresh over ice
Can or Freeze for future parties

Slice garden fresh tomatoes in quarters and add to food processor
Add 1tbs fine salt and 1tbs brown sugar, honey or sorghum syrup
Pulse for 10-15 seconds
Pour through a strainer, collecting juice in bowl, squeeze dry

*use tomato paste for Brie’s Garden Fresh Salsa or roast paste into Brie’s Tomato Soup and Sauce

Brie’s Homegrown Bloody

1/2 quart homegrown tomato juice  bloody marys 2
2 tbs dill pickle juice
1 tbs grated fresh horseradish
1 tbs Worcester Sauce
1 tbs Hot Sauce
1 tbs aged Balsamic Vinegar
Dash of freshly ground pepper
Add Vodka or Gin for a kick!

Serve in a ball jar filled with ice, garnish with an olive and a lid for regular shaking!

_____________________________________________________________________BRIE

BRIE ARTHUR BIO

Originally from southeastern Michigan, Brie Arthur studied Landscape Design at Purdue University. She is the Foodscaping and Landscape Design correspondent for PBS’s Growing A Greener World TV  providing practical advice on integrating edibles in a traditional landscape.

Brie is the National Director of Region IV of GWA The Association for Garden Communicators and serves on the Executive Committee for the International Plant Propagators Society. Arthur founded Emergent: A Group for Growing Professionals as a forum for green industry professionals who promote the value of plants, gardening and all things horticultural as the way of the future.

A former Production Manager at Plant Delights Nursery and Propagator and Grower at Camellia Forest Nursery, Brie inspires and encourages everyone to appreciate hobby of  gardening.

SOCIAL MEDIA CONTACT
FB: Brienne Gluvna Arthur
Instagram: BrieThePlantLady
Twitter: BriePlantLady

 

Foodscaping Presentation

FOODSCAPINGdrone

Brie has fine-tuned her signature design technique of Foodscaping, a sustainable landscape practice that embraces beauty and utility. Working with public school systems, retirement communities and suburban developments, Brie is the changing the way green spaces are designed and utilized.

Encouraging everyone to “think outside of the box,” learn how pairing edibles in a traditional ornamental landscape increases bio-diversity and adds purpose to everyday spaces. She will discuss strategies to create and maintain large scale edible meadows and high impact seasonal foodscape displays. Learn about alternative growing methods like hydroponics, acquaponics and patio planting systems to create an edible oasis in the smallest of spaces. The best edible and ornamental plants are featured to inspire attendees to create purposeful landscapes that engage people of all ages.

Follow and participate through social media:

#AncientGrainTrial #CrazyGrainLady #EdibleEntry #FoundationFoodscape

BOOK BRIE:  Foodscaping101@gmail.com

BRIE ARTHUR BIO

Originally from southeastern Michigan, Brie Arthur studied Landscape Design at Purdue University. She is the Foodscaping and Landscape Design correspondent for PBS’s Growing A Greener World TV  providing practical advice on integrating edibles in a traditional landscape.

Brie is the National Director of Region IV of GWA The Association for Garden Communicators and serves on the Executive Committee for the International Plant Propagators Society. Arthur founded Emergent: A Group for Growing Professionals as a forum for green industry professionals who promote the value of plants, gardening and all things horticultural as the way of the future.

A former Production Manager at Plant Delights Nursery and Propagator and Grower at Camellia Forest Nursery, Arthur will inspire and encourage attendees to appreciate the history and art of Camellias and gardening.

SOCIAL MEDIA CONTACT
FB: Brienne Gluvna Arthur
Instagram: BrieThePlantLady
Twitter: BriePlantLady

Foodscaping

Professionally designed and maintained foodscapes are my hope for the future of American landscapes. As the global population rises locally cultivated food systems will be developed to help reduce the food miles crisis. The sun, soil and irrigation systems of common landscaped spaces such as the suburban developments, corporate campuses, retirement homes and public schools can be harnessed to produce supplemental affordable food for communities. Raising awareness, appreciation and understanding of landscaped food systems will help facilitate a change in the design and management of public green spaces. Someday the landscape industry will be linked to diversified, sustainable, ecologically focused food production.

I began my first foodscape ten years ago when I purchased a home in the suburbs of Raleigh, NC. The truth is I couldn’t afford lumber to build raised beds and fill them with yards of purchased compost. I was a single woman earning my living as a plant propagator and money was really tight! Determined to grow food, I used the foundation landscape that already existed to cultivate seasonal, edible plants. What I discovered was a harmonious marriage of aesthetic and practical qualities. I was hooked on growing food within finely designed spaces and ambitious to meet the criteria of HOA landscape committees. Now, a decade later, every landscape represents the possibility of food production.

Foodscaping isn’t about living off the grid: rather it is the practical integration of edibles in an existing ornamental landscape. It is the opposite of a farm, utilizing tiny spaces within each landscape to produce percentages of food. Organic growing techniques are combined with traditional maintenance practices of mulching and edging to keep the space looking clean and tidy. Beds are designed in a way to best utilize the natural resources of water flow and light while seasonal crops are rotated to enhance the ornamentals. A bio-diverse range of plants are selected to increase populations of beneficial pollinators and wildlife. Foodscapes are living ecosystems that meet the aesthetic needs of the general population while serving a greater purpose for the environment and the kitchen.

The essence of a foodscape comes from the supplemental produce that engages people in a unique capacity: a ripe tomato hanging within a Limelight hydrangea, peppers woven within pink muhly grass, amber waves of grain sweeping as a purposeful groundcover. These unexpected combinations serve to enhance the experience of the passerby while raising awareness of how food grows. Food crops empower people on many levels. From plant recognition to raising awareness of health through consumption, foodscapes offer an opportunity to expand the role horticulture plays in society.
Public schools may be one of the best areas to develop this model. By combining the value of healthy eating and the science of horticulture we can inspire the next generation in a meaningful way. The Bullock Garden project in Glassboro, NJ is a great example of how a horticulture initiative can positively influence society by creating a foodscaped teaching garden.

Through a national collaboration known as #SustainableHeroes, headed up by celebrity landscaper and HGTV host Ahmed Hassan, we “school crashed” the property of Bullock Elementary. An unused courtyard was transformed into a bountiful classroom in one weekend. It was a career changing experience for me in many ways. The excitement of the teachers, administrators and other volunteers filled me with the sense that horticultural knowledge is valuable and necessary. Hearing 500 children chant “Garden! Garden! Garden!” during a pep rally brought tears to my eyes and a sense of meaning I had never experienced before.

Thanks to the generosity of donors like Peace Tree Farms and Organic Mechanics Soil this schoolyard garden is plentiful in its healthy production of fruits and vegetables. The school has partnered with the New Jersey Department of Agriculture’s Jersey Fresh program to raise and serve Jersey Fresh produce in the cafeteria. Chef Simon harvests from the garden for a weekly tasting menu to encourage students to eat more vegetables.
The NJ Agricultural Society trained teachers and provides free courses on how to incorporate garden lessons across the curriculum. Teachers use the garden as a space for instructing writing and reading in addition to teaching growing, harvesting and culinary skills. Under the supervision of teachers and FoodCorps representative Laura Pennington classes have a rotating schedule in the garden. The school plans to continue developing a garden classroom/STEM lab this year as an interactive, instructional learning hub.

Horticulture education belongs in every school system. Students will eat and learn from what they grow! Children relish time spent in a garden and edible classrooms are an excellent way to connect health, wellness and nutrition to horticulture. The green industry has an incredible opportunity to team up with programs like Growing Minds to help train individuals to design and establish school foodscapes by integrating gardening into state and national curriculum.

Growing food has empowered me to set my hopes high and envision a future where landscape maintenance professionals play a role in local organic food production. From public schools to the sprawling suburbs, the sun, soil and irrigation systems are waiting to be harnessed for the greater good of health, wellness, community and environment.